Most Recent Posts

By Otori Ozigi

Unarguably, Ebiraland is gripped in miasma of open politicking, a reflection of electioneering process as witnessed in other climes in the country today at a time the whole Nation is caught up in active politics.

As you may be aware already, next year is an important one in the political evolution of this country, needless to say that there will be four major elections to be conducted by INEC in virtually all the states of the federation. Let me remind us that next year will witness presidential, senatorial, House of Representatives and, finally, state houses of assembly elections, all taking place on a staggered timetable as released by the electoral umpire, INEC.

Recall that the electoral body recently lifted the ban on open campaigns and rallies. Consequently and expectedly, our political class have already gone to the trenches and mapping out various strategies for their full participation in the game of politics come 2019.

Now, let talk about the mood of Ebira Nation. In the spirit of open politicking by major players and party gladiators, palpable anxiety and worrisome happening pervade the polity today.

Let me remind us that come February next year INEC has fixed senatorial election to be conducted in accordance with the umpire guidelines to serve as a template for the polls. In compliance with this guidelines, Alhaji Yakubu Oseni who is running on the ticket of APC, Barr Natasha Akpoti on the ticket of SDP and Senator Ogembe on the platform of PDP are unarguably going to face the verdicts of the electorates come rain come sunshine. One of them will eventually carry on his or shoulder the destiny of over four million Anebira.

At this juncture, I want to enjoin the electorates to shine their eyes very well before casting their votes for the candidates of their choice. I want to appeal to the electorate not to sell their conscience for pecuniary gains or other mundane considerations. They should remember that they carry the burden of the rest of us.

This journalist want to caution the three candidates not to resort to violence or any other unwholesome conduct that may derail our peace. Gone are the days when our politicians would seek political offices through the barrel of the guns and open coercion, senseless buying and selling of votes.

Certainly, this is the time for us to get it right so that Ebiraland can witness a new dawn. Yes! We must get it right this time around. It is my hope that the best candidate should emerge through a credible, free and fair process.

– Otori Ozigi is a former Public Relations officer of the Nigerian Ports Authority, Journalist and Public Relations Expert.
Governor of Ondo State, Arakunrin Oluwarotimi Akeredolu yesterday assured the Ebira Community in the State his administration’s readiness to provide social amenities and access roads to communities and villages to ease farming.

The Governor gave the assurance while playing host to the Ebira Community who paid him a courtesy visit in his office. 

Governor Akeredolu thanked the people for their support and loyalty, extending his greetings to his colleague in Kogi State, Yahaya Bello. 

Not that alone, Governor Akeredolu used the opportunity to admonish the people on sanitation, urging them to always ensure to live in clean and serene environment irrespective of its remoteness.

The Special Assistant to the Governor and Chairman of Ebira Community in APC, Honourable Hassan Ahete pledged the continuous supports of the Ebira people to the Akeredolu led- administration in the State and the re-election bid of President Mohammadu Buhari come 2019.

Further, the Special Assistant requested for inclusiveness in the Government of Arakunrin Akeredolu. Particularly, the restoration of Ebira Radio programme which he said unites his people.

Governor Akeredolu while responding reassured the people that his administration would not discriminate against any individual or group living in the State, saying what matters should be state of residence and not state of origin.
By Alex Adeiza. 

 The Ebira people, my people arguably belong to the league of ethnic groups in Nigeria with a complete cultural system, beautifully packaged way of life and endeavors while peacefully coexisting. The Ebira culture when wholly researched and understood, reveals a communal and logical adoption of practices to complement the belief system of the people.

 Our trajectory into this century has evidently witnessed a plummet in the observance of these cultural practices. Modern religion and civilization are solely responsible for this unfaithfulness to what our forefathers thought they had handed down to be passed on to generations. Concomitantly, the knowledge of these practices wanes gradually, yet at a pace that probably would be difficult for the next generation to grasp. In fact, some of my friends only got to know the mystery behind Ekuechi festival when my curiosity got me to write about it.

 The day a man was born, the day he marries, and the day he dies are the three most important times in a typical Ebira man's sojourn on earth. Therefore, it was pertinent to clearly lay down principles and practices that will guide the observance of these all-important days. Thus, just as Christianity and Islam taught their faithfuls, how a child is christened, a young adult marries and the dead buried are clearly spelt out in our unwritten "Ebipedia."

I only recently started to question myself on these things, and struggled with how our people buried their deads before Islam and Christianity took over. Another curiosity right? Yea! The type that led me into reviewing the work of John Picton, Emeritus Professor of African Art in the University of London, whose research works in Ebira Land are practically unbeatable. In his paper published at the University of Nebraska, he emphasized the significance of such clothes as the "Itokueta," a hand-spun cotton textile made of three pieces.

The distinguishing features were an indigo-dyed weft, and one or other of two distinctive sets of warp stripes; one for the corpses of men, the other for women. It is the responsibility of the family of the deceased's mother (omė'nyi) to supply the itokueta to wrap the bodies of the deceased ready for burial. Meanwhile, if the deceased passed on prematurely, the Ebira tradition holds that the deceased had not achieved the status of grand-parenthood, or if the deceased was otherwise a man or woman of no particular status, a grave would be quickly dug, behind the house or elsewhere, and the body buried the same day as the death itself.

 "If, however, the deceased, whether man or woman, had achieved what was regarded in Ebira tradition as a good death, ie as a grandparent and dieing in hirth order (it was socially difficult for a senior to mourn a junior, for example) the process of hurial would he rather more elahorate. The hody would be on view in the house preferably overnight laid out on a platform in the main passageway, or in a room, and the walls and doorways hung with itokueta. Anyone passing by would see immediately that someone of importance within that community was awaiting burial, and they would see whether it was a man or a woman.

The family might also have invested in some 'itogede,' indigo and white handspun cotton cloth with undyed bast fibres. It was more costly, and thus prestigious, but not gender-specific in its patterning. The body itself would lie on itokueta, covered or dressed in the deceased's clothing, leaving the face and arms visible. Sometimes a cloth of machine-spun yarn, with tloat-weave patterns, would be placed over the clothing, but still leaving at least the face visible." Picton (1996, p.254) In the house where the body lays, women relatives would sing all night long, while a special pot-drum (anuva) is played for people outside to dance. If the deceased happens to be a man, masquerade (eku) might appear to join the dance.

 The following day, people would rest, though mild musical and masquerade activity could prevail until late afternoon when people would reassemble for the burial procession. The body is wrapped in the deceased's clothes, followed by the itokueta and sometimes the itogede that had been draped around the walls and doorways. According to Picton, by the 1960s, a respected and senior man would most definitely be wrapped in the Ubaneito, a red patterned cloth from Kabba axis of Kogi State. Once wrapped, the corpse would be tied with strips of white cloth to a broad plank, wide enough to contain the body. It would be paraded around the village, carried on a man's head, and accompanied by young men, women, drummers and masquerades (if the deceased were a man) in a procession.

The procession with the corpse might well include a man carrying the empty coffin on his head following the man carrying the wrapped corpse. The grave for someone of importance would be dug during the morning of the burial. This is often done in the prominent part of the house such as the front veranda, or the main passage, or its principal public room. Interestingly, on the day of the burial, the children of the deceased appear in the clothes of the deceased, especially for the procession. To this end, there is one underlying similarity between the three religions when it comes to death, the world beyond (idaneku) unanimously agreed to be determined by the deeds of an individual as a sojourner on earth. Though the Ebira traditionalists believe in the reincarnation of the dead revealed by divination, and the return of powerful traditionalists as masquerade performers. "People learn more on their own rather than being force fed." - Socrates.

Alex Adeiza.
credits to EbiraReporters

Administrator of Adavi Local Government Area, Joseph Omuya Salami has added fresh hands into his retinue of cabinet members.

The Council Boss announced the new appointees on Thurday at the Local Government Secretariat, while also inaugurating an Audit Committee on Secondary Schools in the council.

The new appointees will be joining the no fewer than 140 appointed earlier in June, 2018.

The new aides are Isah Ismaila Ozi, the Chief of Staff; Yakubu Sumaila, as Special Adviser on Security; and Yunusa Osuwa, Supervisor of Special Duty.

The Administrator  thanked the former Appointees for their contributions to Adavi LG.

In the same vein, Salami tasked the new audit committee on thorough and objective assignment, and the submission of reports in two weeks. 

Sad: Mr. Yusuf Otaru the chief custodian of "Aneku Cementi", buried amidst tears! Though the reports that came to us earlier was that he was shot dead along side his driver!, Mr. Yusuf was buried in his family house (OHUEJE OBANYI) located at Obehira watch video below:


This video is taken from Ebiraland Media YouTube Channel on YouTube

Part1




Part 2




Please Share this and drop your comments below